Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Peter Frampton

I've been a Frampton fan for many years. He's played with several of my favorite bands and has shown his staying power. Sit back and enjoy.





Here's a little Bio:


Peter Kenneth Frampton (born 22 April 1950) is an English born naturalized American musician, singer, songwriter, producerguitarist and multi-instrumentalist.
Frampton was born in Bromley, England. He attended Bromley Technical High School, at which his father, Owen Frampton, was a teacher and the head of the Art department. He first became interested in music when he was seven years old. Upon discovering his grandmother's banjolele (a banjo-shaped ukulele) in the attic, he taught himself to play, and later taught himself to play guitar and piano as well. At age eight he started taking classical music lessons. By the age of twelve, Frampton played in a band called The Little Ravens. Both he and David Bowie were pupils at Bromley Technical School. The Little Ravens played on the same bill at school as Bowie's band, George and the Dragons. Peter and David would spend time together at lunch breaks, playing Buddy Holly songs.
At the age of 14, Peter was playing with a band called The Trubeats followed by a band called The Preachers, produced and managed by Bill Wyman of The Rolling Stones.
He became a successful child singer, and in 1966, he became a member of The Herd. He was the lead guitarist and singer, scoring a handful of British pop hits. Frampton was named "The Face of 1968" by teen magazine Rave.
In early 1969, when Frampton was 18 years old, he joined with Steve Marriott of The Small Faces to form Humble Pie.
While playing with Humble Pie, Frampton also did session recording with other artists, including: Harry Nilsson, Jim Price, Jerry Lee Lewis, as well as on George Harrison's solo All Things Must Pass, in 1970, and John Entwistle'sWhistle Rymes, in 1972. During the Harrison session he was introduced to the 'talk box' that was to become one of his trademark guitar effects.
After four studio albums and one live album with Humble Pie, Frampton left the band and went solo in 1971, just in time to see Rockin' The Fillmore rise up the US charts. He remained with Dee Anthony, the same personal manager that Humble Pie had used.
His own debut was 1972's Wind of Change, with guest artists Ringo Starr and Billy Preston. This album was followed by Frampton's Camel in 1973, which featured Frampton working within a group project. In 1974, Frampton released Somethin's Happening. Frampton toured extensively to support his solo career, joined for three years by his former Herd mate Andy Bown on keyboards, Rick Wills on Bass, and American drummer John Siomos. In 1975, theFrampton album was released. The album went to #32 in the US charts, and is certified Gold by the RIAA.


Peter Frampton had little commercial success with his early albums. This changed with Frampton's breakthrough best-selling live album, Frampton Comes Alive!, in 1976, from which "Baby, I Love Your Way", "Show Me the Way", and an edited version of "Do You Feel Like We Do", were hit singles. The album sold more than six million copies in the United States alone and spawned several hits. Since then he has released several major albums. He has also worked with David Bowie and both Matt Cameron and Mike McCreadyfrom Pearl Jam, among others. He has also appeared as himself in television shows such as The Simpsons and Family Guy.  

Discography

  • Wind of Change (1972)
  • Frampton's Camel (1973)
  • Somethin's Happening (1974)
  • Frampton (1975)
  • Frampton Comes Alive! (1976)
  • I'm in You (1977)
  • Where I Should Be (1979)
  • Breaking All The Rules (1981)
  • Art of Control (1982)
  • Premonition (1986)
  • When All the Pieces Fit (1989)
  • Peter Frampton (1994)
  • Now (2003)
  • Fingerprints (2006)
  • Thank You Mr. Churchill (2010)



Do You Feel Like We Do




Show Me The Way




Lines On My Face


Baby, I love your Way



While My Guitar Gently Weeps




Black Hole Sun (cover)




I'm In You




Something's Happening




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